Monday, January 09, 2017


Ink-Slinger Profiles by Alex Jay: Ray T. Chatton

Raymond Thomas Chatton was born in Chicago, Illinois, on January 9, 1920, according to the Cook County, Illinois, Birth Certificates Index at His parers were Kenneth Thomas “Chattin” and Agnes Podalsky. It’s unclear if the spelling of “Chattin”, with an “I“, was a misspelling or a transcription error.

Details of Chatton’s early life, education and art training have not been found.

Chatton’s mother, under her maiden name, was counted in her sister’s household in the 1920 U.S. Federal Census which was enumerated on January 15 and 16. Agnes had five siblings at time. Chatton and his father have not been found in the census.

In the 1930 census, Chatton and his parents are missing.

According to the 1940 census, Chatton and his widow mother, Agnes Levey, were Chicago residents living at 2119 West Ogden Avenue. Chatton was employed in the printing industry and his mother was an inspector for an electrical company. Chatton’s highest level of education was the eighth grade. Chatton’s art training may have been at one of the Chicago art schools.

Who’s Who of American Comic Books 1928–1999 said Chatton was a magazine illustrator in 1948 and 1949. Chatton’s earliest comic book work was in Buck Rogers from 1951. 

Courtesy of Heritage Auctions

Chatton illustrated several children’s books in 1954: Dee Dee, the Calico Cat; Walt Disney’s Jiminy Cricket Magic Slate; Mickey Mouse Club Drawing Magic; Jimmy Dodd Magic Slate—Draw the Stars of the Mickey Mouse Club Show in All Different Costumes; and Mickey Mouse Club Drawing Magic.

American Newspaper Comics (2012) said Chatton drew Albert Edward Wiggam’s Let’s Explore Your Mind from October 15, 1951 to October 29, 1955. Chatton was the third of four named artists on the series. He followed Raymond Flanagan and Jack Hamm, and preceded Bill Ligante.

Chain Store Age, November 1966, reported Chatton’s changed of jobs.

Open Pantry Food Marts, Inc.: Raymond Chatton has been made national advertising director of the bantam supermarket chain. Chatton had been art director for C.C. Carlson & Co., printing, publishing and direct mail specialists.
Paperbound Books in Print (1991) had this listing:
God’s Mother Is My Mother. Jack Mulqueen & Ray Chatton. Illus. by Ray Chatton. 28p. (Orig), 1978. 2.50 ( ISBN 0-913382-49-3, 103-13). Prow Bks Franciscan.
Chatton drew the Soldier of God (1982) comic book.

Chatton passed away April 30, 2006, according to the Social Security Death Index, which said his last residence was in Plainfield, Illinois. Chatton was laid to rest at Clarendon Hills Cemetery

—Alex Jay


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