Wednesday, November 13, 2019

 

Ink-Slinger Profiles by Alex Jay: Cleanthe Carr


Cleanthe Kimball Carr was born on April 9, 1911, in Middletown, New Jersey, according to her Social Security application. Her parents were Eugene G. “Gene” Carr, the cartoonist, and Helen G, Stilwell. In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Carr’s parents were Middletown residents on Riverside Drive.

The 1915 New York state census recorded Carr, her parents, a nurse and cook at 66 Tennis Place in Forest Hills, Queens.

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, April 28, 1919, said Carr was one of over a hundred children who were guests at the annual Easter Week activities in the Forest Hills Inn.

In the 1920 census, the Carr family remained in Forest Hills at a different location, the Gardens Apartments on Dartmouth Street.

Carr’s verse was published in the Brooklyn Daily Star, March 28, 1921.

The Fly Peril.
Flies walk on the dirtiest things,
And then right on your plate.
If you eat some germs they carry around,
Death surely would be your fate.

Kill the vile old things with all your might
Before the summer heat.
They shall not walk upon my skin
Nor poison what I eat.

Carr’s artistic talent was noted in the Editor & Publisher, March 4, 1922.
Miss Cleanthe Carr, daughter of Gene Carr, creator of the “Metropolitan Movies” cartoon feature of the New York World, is following in her father's footsteps toward an art career. She is a pupil at Miss Devell’s School and her work is represented in an exhibition of landscape and animal work now being shown at that institution.
Carr and her mother returned from Europe, by way of Le Havre, France, on October 22, 1922.

Carr and her mother, a writer, were Manhattan, New York City residents at 8 East Ninth Street. Apparently Carr’s parents were separated.

Carr’s talent was recognized again by the Associated Press 1927 article, published in numerous papers including the Niagara Falls Gazette.

Convent Girl, 14, Draws Caricatures of Film Notables of Hollywood
Hollywood, (Cal.)., Sept. 27, (AP)—Every now and then some artist from South America or Mexico of France breezes into Hollywood and fascinates the natives with caricatures of screen celebrities.

Fourteen-year-old [sic] Cleanthe Carr came from a Pennsylvania convent, unheralded by the magazines or newspapers. Nor did she even know herself that she was going to cartoon the famous faces of filmdom.

But she had to amuse herself while spending the Summer vacation with her mother, who is a scenario reader, so she looked around and drew pictures of the stars.

Now critics hail Cleanthe as a genius. She is going back to New York soon to finish her preparatory school course, and plans to begin studying art under instructors then. Although her father, Gene Carr, is a successful cartoonist, Cleanthe has not taken any lessons from anyone.

“Except a few at the convent,” she explains, “but I dropped that course in a hurry because I was scolded for not putting enough clothes on my figures.”

Cleanthe was born in Red Bank, N.J., but lived there only a year. When not at school she is usually with her aunt in Brooklyn or in California with her mother.



Carr and her mother visited Europe again in the summer of 1929.

According to the 1930 census, Carr’s mother was a divorcee. She and her mother lived at 160 East 55 Street in Manhattan. Carr was a self-employed commercial artist.

Carr and her mother returned from France on October 16, 1929.

The New York Evening Post, November 2, 1931, reported the death of “Sigmund M. Lehman, brother of Lieutenant Governor Lehman and member of the banking firm of Lehman Brothers, who died in Paris in April, 1930”. Carr was a beneficiary of his estate: “… a temporary life estate in $20,000 to Cleanthe Carr, payable at the age of twenty-four, …”

The Newspaper Feature Service produced a long-running series of romantic cartoons, by several artists, beginning in 1913. Carr contributed to the series in 1934.

The Albany Times Union (New York), April 4, 1935, published an article about identifying the handsomest man in the world. Among the people consulted were artists.

… Neysa McMein, and Cleanthe Carr, artists, found themselves unable to name their selections. Miss McMein pleaded that several years ago she made up a list of handsome men, and that she never had been able to live it down. Miss Carr, daughter of Gene Carr, declared she had never seen an outstandingly handsome man.

But Russell Patterson, famous artist, after much consideration, came forth with this list:

No. 1. Hal Phyfe, New York photographer,
No. 2. Peter Arno, artist.
No. 3, James Montgomery Flagg, artist.

The Syracuse Journal, September 19, 1935, published a photograph of Carr with her drawing of Huey Long. 



The Buffalo Courier Express, August 15, 1939, said “Newest Hollywood ‘must’ is to have a portrait painted by Cleanthe Carr, niece of Kim Moran.”

The gossip column in the Tacoma News Tribune, November 17, 1940, said “When Charlie Chaplin got around to introducing Paulette as ‘my wife’ in New York they were staying at separate hotels. And Chollie did the big town with Cleanthe Carr.”

In the late 1930s Carr moved to California. The portrait artist’s address in the 1940 census was 6470 Ivarene Avenue in Los Angeles. Lodging with Carr and her mother was Lionel Braham, 61, an actor and singer in motion pictures.

The California Marriage Index, at Ancestry.com, said Carr married Samuel Weill, on August 12, 1960 in Monterey, California. Who’s Who in Finance and Industry (1999) said Weill was an automobile company executive and Carr was his second wife. They divorced July 21, 1982 in Los Angeles.

Carr passed away October 1, 2001, in Los Angeles, according to the Social Security Death Index.

 

—Alex Jay

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Tuesday, November 12, 2019

 

Ink-Slinger Profiles by Alex Jay: Nell Reppy


Nellie “Nell” Reppy was born on October 7, 1903 or 1904 or 1905 or 1906, in Boulder, Colorado. A 1913 newspaper article said she was ten years old. Three passenger lists have the birth years 1904, 1905 and 1906, and her birthplace.

In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Reppy was the second of three children born to William, a mining engineer and surveyor, and Mary. The family resided in Carthage, Missouri at 1104 Main Street.

The Denver Rocky Mountain News (Colorado), November 9, 1913, reported Reppy’s beating by five schoolmates.

Boys Attack Small Girl
Gang Assaults Child Near Where All Parties Attend Boulder School
Boulder, Colo., Nov. 8.—Nellie Reppy, a ten-year-old Boulder girl, was attacked by a gang of five young Boulder boys yesterday afternoon and beaten. The attack occurred near the Highland school, where the young girl and the boys attend school. No cause for the attack is known.

Reppy was mentioned in the Elk Mountain Pilot (Crested Butte, Colorado), April 11, 1918, “Miss Nellie Reppy came in the last of the week from Doyleville for a few days visit with her aunt, Mrs. H.H. Fogg.”

According to the 1920 census, Reppy and her mother, a widow, lived with Reppy’s mother’s brother, E R McConnell, a widower, in Gunnison, Colorado on Rainbow Route.

Information about Reppy’s art training has not been found.

The 1924 Denver, Colorado city directory listed Reppy, no occupation given, and her mother, a
Denver Art Museum matron, at 1300 Logan.

At some point both moved to New York City. The 1930 census said their Manhattan address was 240 East 79th Street. Reppy was a self-employed artist. and her mother a dressmaker.

Reppy’s drawings appeared in Harper’s Bazaar, April 1931.

The New York, New York, Extracted Marriage Index, at Ancestry.com, said Reppy married Edward C O’Donnell on January 22, 1932 in Manhattan.

A passenger list recorded Reppy departing Trinidad, British West Indies, on March 14, 1933 and arriving in New York on March 24. Her address was 70 West 85th Street, New York City.

According to the New York Evening Post, October 10, 1933, Reppy had a representative.

Tom Patterson, brother of Russell, the artist has opened a personalized store at 33 West Twenty-eighth Street to cater to commercial artists, particularly those in agency work. He will continue to represent his brother, Robert E. Lee, Ed Graham, Ed Walter, Nell Reppy and Julian Brazelton.
Reppy’s husband passed away August 2, 1934 in Manhattan.

The Newspaper Feature Service produced a long-running series of romantic cartoons, by several artists, beginning in 1913. Reppy contributed to the series in 1934.

Reppy’s address was the same on passengers lists from 1935, a trip to Mexico, and 1936, a visit to Europe.

The 1940 census recorded Reppy and her mother in Manhattan at 225 East 74th Street. Reppy, who had four years of high school, was attending school.

Reppy illustrated several books including The Little Builders’ ABC (1943), Australia (1945), A Penny for Candy (1946), Making Sure of Arithmetic, Grade 5 (1946), Making Sure of Arithmetic Grade 6 (1946), Making Sure of Arithmetic Grade 8 (1946), Come Play with Us (1947), Here Am I (1947) and Neighbors Around the World (1948).

Reppy’s address in the 1949 Manhattan directory was 210 East 68th Street.

At some point Reppy married Theodore Edward Shepard.

An airline passenger card said her permanent address was “Acueduct R. Hondo 330, Mexico.” On April 11, 1963, she flew from Mexico to Miami, Florida.

Reppy was listed in the 1969 Anglo-American Directory of Mexico.

Shepard, Theodore (Am.); wife, Nell Reppy (Am.); ch.: Anthony. Bus. Pl. Santos Degollado 10-402, z. l. Tel. 5-12-12-31. Also see Sonora, Res. Acueducto Rio Hondo 330, Virreyea, z.10. Tel. 5-20-51-64. Also see Morelos. Clubs: Am, Ref.
Reppy passed away on August 20, 1969, in Mexico. The Department of State death report said Reppy’s American address was 112 Southwest Hamilton Street, Portland, Oregon, and Mexican address was Acueducto Rio Hondo 330, Mexico. The cause of death was pulmonary metastasis. Her remains were sent to Finley Tyson Funeral Home in Portland.

 

—Alex Jay

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Monday, November 11, 2019

 

The Newspaper Feature Service Romantic Cartoon Series, Part 12 (1934)

After the comparative calm of 1931-33, the romantic cartoon contributors are back to being in constant flux starting in 1934. Russell Patterson is now gone, leaving Raeburn Van Buren (RB) and Dorothy Flack (DF) as our bastions of regularity. We also have some flux in our indexing, as the Lincoln Journal craps out on us and we rely now on the Iowa City Press-Citizen as backup for the Harrisburg Evening News, which more and more often is leaving us high and dry, typically on Saturdays. 

Our first entrant in the 1934 game of musical chairs is Fred Royal Morgan (FM), who had previously shown up in 1933 with a single cartoon. This time at bat he manages four in January - February.  Also in February we get a few cartoons from L. F. Van Zelm (VZ), who otherwise had pretty much disappeared from the syndicated cartooning arena during the 1930s. He managed three cartoons in February - March.



New in March is Nell Reppy (NR). Her elegantly drawn cartoons will be regularly seen for the rest of the year, but then will disappear shortly into 1935. Reppy would go on to a later career illustrating picture books for young children. She's one of the new breed of contributors who supply gag cartoons as opposed to romantic flights of fancy.



In June, Lucy Vierow (LV) makes her debut. She'll become a long-term regular of the feature. June is also when Dorothy Flack ceases to be a regular contributor. 

July signals a new trend in which the romantic cartoons once again can't seem to keep to a regular schedule. While they almost always manage to appear three days per week, no longer can they be depended upon to appear on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays.




In September we meet Marcia L. Snyder (MS).  She'll manage four cartoons in September - October, and then disappear for long periods. Alex Jay profiles her over on his Tenth Letter blog. September - October is also when Frank Ellis (FE) contributes two cartoons. Ellis had just lost his job working on Jane Arden, but evidently couldn't crack the romantic cartoon as a new regular spot. 



Our final new contributor this year is Cléanthe Carr (CC), who sneaks in on December 29th. She'll be a semi-regular next year. Ms. Carr is apparently the daughter of the great Gene Carr, and was known not only as an illustrator but also as a fancier of Chow dogs, of all things.

1934


Jan     Su                  M                  Tu                 W                  Th                F                   Sa
1 RB 2 3 RB 4 5 6 RB
7 8 RB 9 10 RB 11 12 DF 13
14 15 DF 16 17 RB 18 19 20 RB
21 22 DF 23 24 RB 25 26 27 FM
28 29 RB 30 31 RB

Feb
1 2 3 FM
4 5 RB 6 7 RB 8 9 10 RB
11 12 VZ 13 14 RB 15 16 17 FM
18 19 VZ 20 21 RB 22 23 24 FM
25 26 27 RB 28

Mar
1 VZ 2 3 DF
4 5 RB 6 7 NR 8 9 10 DF
11 12 NR 13 14 DF 15 RB 16 17
18 19 20 RB 21 22 RB 23 24 NR
25 26 RB 27 28 NR 29 RB 30 31

Apr
1 2 DF 3 4 RB 5 6 7 RB
8 9 DF 10 11 RB 12 DF 13 14
15 16 NR 17 18 RB 19 RB 20 21
22 23 NR 24 25 RB 26 27 28 DF
29 30 RB

May
1 2 NR 3 4 5 DF
6 7 8 9 NR 10 11 12 DF
13 14 NR 15 16 RB 17 18 19 NR
20 21 RB 22 23 DF 24 25 26 NR
27 28 RB 29 30 NR 31

Jun
1 2 DF
3 4 NR 5 6 RB 7 8 9 DF
10 11 RB 12 13 LV 14 15 16 NR
17 18 NR 19 20 RB 21 22 23 LV
24 25 NR 26 27 RB 28 29 30 NR

Jul
1 2 RB 3 4 ? 5 6 7 LV
8 9 10 NR 11 12 LV 13 14 RB
15 16 17 RB 18 19 NR 20 21 LV
22 23 NR 24 25 LV 26 27 28 RB
29 30 31 LV

Aug
1 2 3 4 NR
5 6 RB 7 8 LV 9 10 11 LV
12 13 NR 14 15 DF 16 17 LV 18
19 20 NR 21 22 RB 23 24 DF 25
26 27 RB 28 29 LV 30 31

Sep
1 LV
2 3 NR 4 5 LV 6 7 8 RB
9 10 11 MS 12 13 NR 14 15 RB
16 17 18 RB 19 20 LV 21 22 NR
23 24 FE 25 26 RB 27 28 29 LV
30

Oct
1 2 RB 3 4 LV 5 6 MS
7 8 9 NR 10 11 RB 12 13 MS
14 15 16 RB 17 18 LV 19 20 NR
21 22 23 NR 24 25 FE 26 27 LV
28 29 RB 30 31 MS

Nov
1 2 3 NR
4 5 LV 6 7 NR 8 9 10 RB
11 12 NR 13 14 LV 15 16 17 RB
18 19 NR 20 21 RB 22 23 24 LV
25 26 27 LV 28 29 ? 30

Dec
1 NR
2 3 LV 4 5 NR 6 7 8 RB
9 10 RB 11 12 LV 13 14 15 NR
16 17 18 NR 19 20 NR 21 22 RB
23 24 25 26 27 LV 28 29 CC
30 31 LV

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Saturday, November 09, 2019

 

What The Cartoonists Are Doing, November 1914 (Vol.6 No.5)

[Cartoons Magazine, debuting in 1912, was a monthly magazine devoted primarily to reprinting editorial cartoons from U.S. and foreign newspapers. Articles about cartooning and cartoonists often supplemented the discussion of current events.

In November 1913 the magazine began to offer a monthly round-up of news about cartoonists and cartooning, eventually titled "What The Cartoonist Are Doing." There are lots of interesting historical nuggets in these sections, and this Stripper's Guide feature will  reprint one issue's worth each week.]

CARTOONS OF THE MONTH
The difficulty of obtaining cartoons from German or Austrian sources thus far has a tendency to make a collection of cartoons such as presented in this issue, somewhat pro-English in tone, if not actually anti-German. The British newspapers, which at first appealed more to the patriotic side in their cartoons, have become more virulent, especially as reports of the alleged atrocities of the German army in Belgium gained credence. The culminating effort perhaps is represented by Bernard Partridge's cartoon in Punch representing a German soldier advancing to battle, shielding himself behind a woman and her child.

For the most part the American cartoonists have restrained their feelings, whatever sentiments they might privately have entertained, and confined themselves to delineating the more general aspects of the war, with here and there a touch of human interest. It might seem quite impossible for anyone to extract humor from so grim a situation, yet somehow the American artists seem to have done so, and without overstepping the proprieties. Of skeletons and death's heads, of course, there have been many; but news has been scarce, and the world still awaits reports of a decisive battle. The preliminary peace talk, premature though it may be, has inspired many cartoonists. The advance of the Russian bear westward, the indications of restlessness in Turkey, President Wilson's appeal for a war tax, together with the onslaught on the “pork barrel,” and the appeal of the Belgian commission to the government at Washington, have supplied other topics.

Politics, also, has crept into the news columns, and cartoonists in the thick of the fight have had to devote their attention to this ever-dominant subject. Were it not for the war, the November elections, especially in New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, and the recent election in Maine, might alone have kept the cartoonists busy. A momentary interest in the evacuation of Vera Cruz by the United States troops was reflected in a few scattering cartoons. Almost any diversion being welcomed at present. It is probable that for many weeks to come, however, the struggle in the eastern hemisphere will continue to be the all-absorbing topic, and the foreign cartoons of the events will be of greatest interest.

Art Young
CELEBRITIES OF THE PAST
Art Young, who conducts and illustrates a page or two of causerie in the Metropolitan Magazine, has been burrowing into the tomes of the past. He has discovered that the public men most caricatured a generation ago were Tilden, Conkling, Grant, Beecher, Blaine, Ben Butler, Judge Folger, President Arthur, General Hancock, David Davis, William Vanderbilt, Jay Gould, William Evarts, Don Cameron, Charles A. Dana, Whitelaw Reid, James Gordon Bennett, and Henry Watterson.

“Bennett and Watterson,” says Mr. Young, “are the only members of this notable group still living, and both are publicly active. Looking over weekly periodicals of that time, 1870 to 1880, I made note of the way the cartoonists pictured these two men. Watterson was usually dressed like a typical Kentucky colonel of the day. Bennett was often portrayed as a tall, thin, man about-town, with a plaster on the bridge of his nose, significant of something, no doubt. Just what, we will leave to a keener explorer for biographical fact. It was Nast who caricatured Bennett as a Caesar up to date, assuming heroic attitudes.

“This series of cartoons was directed against the editor's frenzy over Caesarism, a term used continually by the Herald to describe Mr. Bennett's fear that General Grant's ultimate purpose was to rule the United States as Caesar ruled Rome. “And in this connection it may be mentioned that only two cartoonists whose work was familiar in those early days— F. B. Opper and W. A. Rogers—are still energetically at it—and both are several years this side of the three score and ten.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Cartoonists have about exhausted all the traditional figures of “Death” in their war cartoons, but Death remains indefatigable. —St. Louis Democrat.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Art is fleeting, especially newspaper cartoon art. But there are some notable exceptions to the rule in what has been inspired by the present cataclysm in Europe, as most observers will acknowledge.—Brooklyn Eagle.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Dr. Dawson Johnston, public librarian of St. Paul, Minn., has arranged an exhibition of war cartoons in the library, showing the work of the most prominent newspaper artists in the country.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Charles Runyan, known in Nevada as “the cartoonist of the desert,” has been devoting his efforts recently to oil painting, including portraiture.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Colvig as Bozo the Clow
Vance D. Colvig, otherwise “Pinto, the tramp cartoonist,” box-car idol, and circus band-wagon enthusiast, has joined the staff of the Reno, Nev., Roadroller.

SOME RECENT FRENCH CARTOONS
The Guerre Sociale of Paris recently published two cartoons with the heading, “A Failed Napoleon.” In one the kaiser is shown gazing seaward and saying, “Tomorrow it will be St. Helena.” In the second the kaiser is in a straitjacket, and below is the statement, “No, sire, Charenton.” Charenton is the national asylum for the insane in the suburbs of Paris. Another Parisian cartoon which has caused widespread comment represents the Emperor Franz Josef standing on a battle field strewn with dead, and saying, “I wonder if it is true that I grieved the late pope.”



C.R. Macauley
MACAULEY AS A PLAYWRIGHT
C. R. Macauley, cartoonist and novelist, has been assisting David Belasco in the production of a symbolical spectacle to be called “The Prince of Peace,” which, it is hoped, will vitalize the final argument in behalf of universal peace. Andrew Carnegie is one of the sponsors of the production.
In “The Prince of Peace” a history of the world will be epitomized and unfolded in a series of stage pictures that will be realistic in their revelations of bloodshed, of tyranny, of selfishness, and of the tragic misery, and devastation following in the train of wars. The drama shows Christ as the first apostle of peace and is woven together and made appealingly human by the use of the character in legendary lore, Cartaphilus, the Roman doorkeeper for Pilate, who struck Jesus as He came out of the Hall of Judgment.

RUSTEM BEY'S PROTEST
The Turkish ambassador's recent criticism of American cartoonists and press humorists has drawn forth a challenge from “Marse” Henry Watterson, editor of the Louisville Courier-Journal. Colonel Watterson devotes an entire editorial to answering the representative of the Sublime Porte, and what he has to say will interest all cartoonists. To quote:

“A. Rustem Bey, who protests against the levity with which the American newspapers discuss, and cartoon the position of Turkey with regard to the European war indicates a lack of thoroughness. Our distinguished visitor from the Sublime Porte has not learned to understand the meaning of American humor, and the feeling behind it.

“If the cartoons in which the Turk is caricatured hurt A. Rustem Bey in his center of patriotism or his center of 'amour propre' he is not yet a cosmopolitan, as many of his countrymen are. Surely a cartoon of “Uncle Sam" is no further from a truthful depiction of the typical Yankee than the average cartoon of a Turk is from the truth about Turks. Everyone who has had the pleasure of meeting Turkish gentlemen has found it indeed a pleasure, and has found them cultivated, enlightened, exceptionally good linguists, and excellent company. But the Terrible Turk has not altogether disliked being classified as ‘Terrible' and his feelings should not be so tender that he cannot view without a sense of injustice and injury a Yankee cartoon picturing him with a curved blade dripping blood. Moreover the modern history of Turkey has not been, as all educated Turks know well enough, in all respects creditable to the administration, and there is no blinking the facts. There is no reason for sugar coating either cartoon or comment in discussing them.”

McCUTCHEON A WAR PRISONER
John T. McCutcheon, cartoonist and war correspondent of the Chicago Tribune, was one of a party of American newspapermen who managed to reach Dutch soil after having been held prisoners by the Germans in Belgium and France. For an entire week the party had been under surveillance at Aix-la-Chapelle. McCutcheon's detention was made the subject of inquiry by the state department, and he was located finally through the efforts of Ambassador Gerard. The Chicago artist considered himself fortunate to have escaped the fate of a fellow craftsman, Lawrence Stein Stevens, formerly of Detroit, who was sentenced to death by a demented German officer, and was freed only at the last moment.

A CARTOON SERMONETTE
A cartoon by Chapin of the St. Louis Republic, entitled “Long Live the King,” and showing a mother kneeling at her baby's cradle while the shells are bursting outside, is made the subject of a little sermon in the Pueblo Chieftain:

“The picture,” says the Chieftain, “tells the other story. Not the story of the glory of dying on the field of battle, but the story of sorrow, disappointment and misery in the home, that the king may live. It is the picture not of the masculine part of the family rushing forward against the batteries of the enemies that the flag which he carries may float over some new possession, but is the picture of the feminine heart of the nation bereft of its support, loaded with its responsibility of young motherhood and suffering the anguish that can only be known to our mothers.

“‘Long Live the King,' could it be seen by every civilized, disinterested person today, would create a world-wide sentiment that would almost force an immediate ending of the war.”

BEN BOLT, THE BOY PRODIGY
By Frank Hammond, Cartoonist of the Wichita Eagle

Oh, don't you remember the school house, Ben Bolt,
Where we went in the long-ago days;
Where you used to cartoon everybody in town
In your books or in other sly ways?
I discovered the map in the attic, Ben Bolt,
Your map of the African war,
Where you pictured the plight of our teacher so grim,
Full of arrows in old Zanzibar.

You remember our teacher, sweet Alice, Ben Bolt,
With eyes so alert and so keen,
Who refused to rejoice when you drew in your books,
And rapped you, forsooth, on the bean?
I have saved all those books which you gave me, Ben Bolt,
When we left the school long, long ago,
And I smile at the drawings—so crude they seen now
They are gems that in memory glow.

Oh, don't you remember the speller, Ben Bolt,
With the cover so prim and so blue,
Where you sketched the dear teacher and Constable Brown
Making vows that they'd ever be true?
That speller is still on my bookshelf, Ben Bolt,
But, alas, I have looked there in vain
For the words that she spoke when she saw the cartoon,
And proceeded to mete out the pain.

In the halcyon days gone forever, Ben Bolt,
When you covered your slate and your books
With crude hieroglyphics; adorned house and fence,
And the prominent places and nooks,
I knew that your pictures would gain great renown,
And today they are famous and grand;
But I cherish the ones in the school books, Ben Bolt,
That were sketched by your own boyish hand.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Charles Wolf, of Spokane, Washington, local manager for Judge Turner in the campaign of the latter for the democratic nomination for the United States senate, received recently a complete set of the cartoons drawn by Homer Davenport during the first Bryan campaign. Some time ago Mr. Wolf, who is a warm friend of “Uncle Johnny” Davenport, father of the late cartoonist, conceived the idea he would like to own a copy of the early cartoons of Davenport, the ones wherein capital was represented as a large person with dollar signs all over his clothing. Mr. Wolf commissioned a second-hand book company in the east to advertise for the set, which was out of print.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Eddie Eksergian
The engagement of “Eddie” Eksergian, sport cartoonist of the St. Louis Globe Democrat, and Miss Clara E. Langan, daughter of Mrs. E. C. Langan of St. Louis, has been announced.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

“War cartoons depicting the w. k. Grim Reaper,” said Noah Count of Chiggerbite, with a contemptuous drawl, “do not score any bulls' eyes with me. A skull is hardly a dainty subject for art, even in time of war. And furthermore, it looks to me like just so much free advertising for Berry M. Aull, the undertaker.”—Kansas City Times.

TO THE CARTOONIST
A correspondent of the Cleveland Plain Dealer recently paid the following tribute to the American cartoonist:

"Out of all that has been written about the war—the lives lost, the ships sunk, and the thousands of buckets of ink that have been spilled, there is one man that I admire, and one man only. That man is the Yankee newspaper cartoonist.

“In my opinion, he is the man of the hour; the coolest, the most deliberate, a man of clear vision and his pencil the most ennobling.

“Until about yesterday, I thought he was just a fellow who ridiculed politicians, and satirized passing events. A man of mirth and merriment, who lampooned and lambasted everything and everybody. The manner of man who creates a tall skinny fellow, with a long nose, who hurls a brick at a little fat man—silk hatted, with a fringe of whiskers round his map, thus making the rabble howl with laughter.

“I now see him in a different light. An artist who draws pictures of sorrow and pathos, of brutality and shame, after looking at things in the light of cool, clear logic. He is no professional liar either. His pictures are always borne out by facts. He holds up the planet in his hands, gazes at it as impressively as the soothsayer does at his crystal, and ‘dopes' out the why and wherefore of the passing show to a nicety.

"I've gained lots of inspiration from the artist. Oh! that kings, slaves and adventurers with the beast in man, in this war of pretence, could see themselves as the artist sees them. They would stop and say to themselves: ‘Think, man, think!’

“If the gaunt, hungry, frothy-mouth wolves of war who are snarling and tearing the garments of civilization to tatters could only see a picture of the American farmer reaping the grain, in a land of peace and plenty, it might bring them to their senses.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Harry Palmer, cartoonist and war correspondent, has been on the firing line in Belgium in the interests of an eastern film company. During the Boxer uprising in China Mr. Palmer represented a syndicate of American newspapers. He is known to many newspaper readers as the author of the “Babbling Bess” comics.

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R. L. Goldberg, the New York Evening Mail cartoonist, who was marooned in Europe at the outbreak of the war, has reached America, and has been writing an account of his experiences for his newspaper.

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The thousands of cartoons of Death in connection with the present war should have been held for release.—Helena Independent.

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Friday, November 08, 2019

 

Wish You Were Here, from Myer Marcus


Myer Marcus pokes fun at his own profession on this postcard. Although the manufacturer of the card isn't credited, the "Aurocrome series" and "A22" numbering indicates it must be from the Rose Company, which published Marcus' other cards.

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Thursday, November 07, 2019

 

Ink-Slinger Profiles by Alex Jay: Natalie Jenkins Bond


Natalie Jenkins Bond was born Natalie Whaley Jenkins on May 18, 1902, in Warrenton, Virginia. Her birth date is from the Social Security Death Index and birthplace was identified in the Baltimore Evening Sun, (Maryland), September 19, 1969.

In the 1910 U.S. Federal Census, Bond was the fifth of six children born to Micah (1857–1912), an Internal Revenue Service collector, and Natalie (1865–1926). The family resided in Columbia, South Carolina.

According to the 1920 census, the head of the household was Bond’s mother, a widow and U.S. Army field clerk. Bond was a bookkeeper at a ship broker. The family were residents of Charleston, South Carolina at 34 Pitt Street. The 1920 city directory said Bond worked at the Charleston Lighterage & Transportation Company.

Information about Bond’s art training has not been found.

Bond married George T. Bond (1901-1955) in the early 1920s. Their daughter, Mary, was born on July 5, 1924 in Baltimore, Maryland, according to Mary’s Social Security application.

American Newspaper Comics (2012) said Bond drew Racie Gracie, from June 25, 1928 to 1929, for the McClure Syndicate.

The 1930 census recorded Bond as a divorcee and newspaper artist living in Jersey City, New Jersey, at 88 Van Reypen Street.

The Newspaper Feature Service produced a long-running series of romantic cartoons, by several artists, beginning in 1913. Bond contributed to the series in 1931.

For the Newark Star-Ledger (New Jersey), Bond wrote a column, The Feminine Slant, which appeared in the home section, from August 1 to November 17, 1945.


Charleston News and Courier 3/24/1939

From the mid-1940s to mid-1950s Bond contributed stories to pulp magazines, Fifteen Love Stories and Love Novels Magazine. For Fifteen Love Stories she wrote two-page stories for the feature, Design for Romance. Two stories are available: May 1952, “The Navy Blue Tattoo” and March 1954, “The Myth and the Legend”. The illustrations are not signed. For Love Novels Magazine her stories appeared in the feature, Vignettes of Love.

The Evening Sun said

In the 1930's and 1940’s, Mrs. Bond lived in Baltimore. At that time, she wrote the copy and did the art work on the syndicated features known as “Grandmother’s Cookbook” and “Racy Gracy.”

During this period she also worked as a free-lance illustrator and her office studio was located at Baltimore’s Mount Vernon Place. Mrs. Bond painted the murals depicting children’s story characters at Calvert School in Baltimore.

Mrs. Bond’s last newspaper job was with the Washington Post, where she worked in the real estate advertising section. She retired in 1964.

She was the co-editor of the recently published book, “The South Carolinians,” the Civil War memoirs of two Confederate officers.

Bond passed away on September 17, 1969, in Washington, D.C. She was laid to rest at Saint Paul's Episcopal Church Cemetery.


—Alex Jay

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Wednesday, November 06, 2019

 

The Newspaper Feature Service Romantic Cartoon Series, Part 11 (1931-33)



Today we cover the most consistent and therefore least interesting years of the romantic cartoon. As you may recall from the previous post, in 1930 Dorothy Flack (DF) completely took over the cartoon starting in September. Based on the earlier history of the panel you might have been assuming that wouldn't last long. But if you look below at the index, you'll find a sea of DFs. Flack was essentially the sole contributor for two and a half years. The only exception is a single cartoon, published on February 5 1931, credited to Natalie Jenkins Bond (NB).

First King Features copyright, January 14 1932


There is one important change in January 1932. It was then that Hearst decided to phase out some of his many different syndicate company names, and concentrate most everything under the King Features banner. The copyright changes on this feature with the installment of January 14 1932, making our post title inaccurate for the remainder of the run. I'm going to stick with that title, though, because in the 1920s there was another romantic cartoon series that was distributed by King Features, which I can only assume had disappeared by 1932 (that one firmly resists indexing so far), and I don't want to confuse the two.

Finally in 1933 we get some of the familiar action with the romantic cartoon panel as Flack gets reduced to just part of a team of contributors.Unfortunately for a weary indexer, the magazine page now can't keep to a regular schedule of cartoon appearances. Generally speaking, the three cartoons per week are now appearing on Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays, but there are lots of exceptions. There are also quite a few weeks when only two cartoons make it to the page. As best I can tell, this is a problem with the page, not with the papers carrying it.




The new contributors for 1933 show that the Depression made most any work attractive to cartoonists and illustrators. Our new regulars are well-known and respected names: Raeburn Van Buren starts on April 3, and Russell Patterson follows on June 5. Oddly, Van Buren, known in this era mostly as an illustrator, eschews the paragraphs of romantic drivel everyone else uses and supplies gag titles. Patterson, on the other hand, merely illustrates the romantic paragraphs.




Other contributors in 1933 are Fred Royal Morgan who offers a single cartoon on September 20, and Eugene (Gene) McNerney, who makes two appearances with honest-to-good gag cartoons, on June 19 and July 15.

 

1931


Jan     Su                  M                  Tu                 W                  Th                F                   Sa
1 DF 2 3
4 5 6 DF 7 8 DF 9 10 DF
11 12 13 DF 14 15 DF 16 17 DF
18 19 20 DF 21 22 DF 23 24 DF
25 26 27 DF 28 29 DF 30 31 DF

Feb
1 2 3 DF 4 5 NB 6 7 DF
8 9 10 DF 11 12 DF 13 14 DF
15 16 17 DF 18 19 DF 20 21 DF
22 23 24 DF 25 26 DF 27 28 DF

Mar
1 2 3 DF 4 5 DF 6 7 DF
8 9 10 DF 11 12 DF 13 14 DF
15 16 17 DF 18 19 DF 20 21 DF
22 23 24 DF 25 26 DF 27 28 DF
29 30 31

Apr
1 2 DF 3 4 DF
5 6 7 DF 8 9 DF 10 11 DF
12 13 14 DF 15 16 DF 17 18 DF
19 20 21 DF 22 23 DF 24 25 DF
26 27 28 DF 29 30 DF

May
1 2 DF
3 4 5 DF 6 7 DF 8 9 DF
10 11 12 DF 13 14 DF 15 16 DF
17 18 19 DF 20 21 DF 22 23 DF
24 25 26 DF 27 28 DF 29 30 DF
31

Jun
1 2 DF 3 4 DF 5 6 DF
7 8 9 DF 10 11 DF 12 13 DF
14 15 16 DF 17 18 DF 19 20 DF
21 22 23 DF 24 25 DF 26 27 DF
28 29 30 DF

Jul
1 2 DF 3 4 DF
5 6 7 DF 8 9 DF 10 11 DF
12 13 14 DF 15 16 DF 17 18 DF
19 20 21 DF 22 23 DF 24 25 DF
26 27 28 DF 29 30 DF 31

Aug
1 DF
2 3 4 DF 5 6 DF 7 8 DF
9 10 11 DF 12 13 DF 14 15 DF
16 17 18 DF 19 20 DF 21 22 DF
23 24 25 DF 26 27 DF 28 29 DF
30 31

Sep
1 DF 2 3 DF 4 5 DF
6 7 8 DF 9 10 11 DF 12 DF
13 14 15 DF 16 17 DF 18 19 DF
20 21 22 DF 23 24 DF 25 26 DF
27 28 29 DF 30

Oct
1 DF 2 3 DF
4 5 6 DF 7 8 DF 9 10 DF
11 12 13 DF 14 15 DF 16 17 DF
18 19 20 DF 21 22 DF 23 24 DF
25 26 27 DF 28 29 30 31 DF

Nov
1 2 3 DF 4 5 DF 6 7 DF
8 9 10 DF 11 12 DF 13 14 DF
15 16 17 DF 18 19 DF 20 21 DF
22 23 24 DF 25 26 DF 27 28 DF
29 30

Dec
1 DF 2 3 DF 4 5 DF
6 7 8 DF 9 10 DF 11 12 DF
13 14 15 DF 16 17 DF 18 19 DF
20 21 22 DF 23 24 DF 25 26
27 28 29 DF 30 31 DF

1932


Jan     Su                  M                  Tu                 W                  Th                F                   Sa
1 DF 2
3 4 5 DF 6 7 DF 8 9 DF
10 11 12 DF 13 14 DF* 15 16 DF
17 18 19 DF 20 21 DF 22 23 DF
24 25 26 DF 27 28 DF 29 30 DF
31
* Start of King Features copyright

Feb
1 2 DF 3 4 DF 5 6 DF
7 8 9 DF 10 11 DF 12 13 DF
14 15 16 DF 17 18 DF 19 20 DF
21 22 23 DF 24 25 DF 26 27 DF
28 29

Mar
1 DF 2 3 DF 4 5 DF
6 7 8 DF 9 10 DF 11 12 DF
13 14 15 DF 16 17 DF 18 19 DF
20 21 22 DF 23 24 DF 25 26 DF
27 28 29 DF 30 31 DF

Apr
1 2 DF
3 4 5 DF 6 7 DF 8 9 DF
10 11 12 DF 13 14 DF 15 16 DF
17 18 19 DF 20 21 DF 22 23 DF
24 25 26 DF 27 28 DF 29 30 DF

May
1 2 3 DF 4 5 DF 6 7 DF
8 9 10 DF 11 12 DF 13 14 DF
15 16 17 18 19 DF 20 21 DF
22 23 24 DF 25 26 DF 27 28 DF
29 30 31

Jun
1 2 DF 3 4 DF
5 6 7 DF 8 9 DF 10 11 DF
12 13 14 DF 15 16 DF 17 18 DF
19 20 21 DF 22 23 DF 24 25 DF
26 27 28 DF 29 30 DF

Jul      Su                  M                 Tu                 W                Th                   F                  Sa
1 2 DF
3 4 5 DF 6 7 DF 8 9 DF
10 11 12 DF 13 14 DF 15 16 DF
17 18 19 DF 20 21 DF 22 23 DF
24 25 26 DF 27 28 DF 29 30 DF
31

Aug
1 2 DF 3 4 DF 5 6 DF
7 8 9 DF 10 11 DF 12 13 DF
14 15 16 DF 17 18 DF 19 20 DF
21 22 23 DF 24 25 DF 26 27 DF
28 29 30 DF 31

Sep
1 DF 2 3 DF
4 5 6 DF 7 8 DF 9 10 DF
11 12 13 DF 14 15 DF 16 17 DF
18 19 20 DF 21 22 DF 23 24 DF
25 26 27 DF 28 29 DF 30

Oct
1 DF
2 3 4 DF 5 6 DF 7 8 DF
9 10 11 DF 12 13 DF 14 15 DF
16 17 18 DF 19 20 DF 21 22 DF
23 24 25 DF 26 27 DF 28 29 DF
30 31

Nov
1 DF 2 3 DF 4 5 DF
6 7 8 9 10 DF 11 12 DF
13 14 15 DF 16 17 DF 18 19 DF
20 21 22 DF 23 24 DF 25 26 DF
27 28 29 DF 30

Dec
1 DF 2 3 DF
4 5 6 DF 7 8 DF 9 10 DF
11 12 13 DF 14 15 DF 16 17 DF
18 19 20 DF 21 22 DF 23 24 DF
25 26 27 28 29 DF 30 31 DF

1933


Jan     Su                  M                  Tu                 W                  Th                F                   Sa
1 2 DF 3 4 5 DF 6 7 DF
8 9 10 DF 11 12 DF 13 14 DF
15 16 17 DF 18 19 DF 20 21 DF
22 23 24 DF 25 26 DF 27 28 DF
29 30 31 DF

Feb
1 2 DF 3 4 DF
5 6 7 DF 8 9 DF 10 11 DF
12 13 14 DF 15 16 DF 17 18 DF
19 20 21 DF 22 23 DF 24 25 DF
26 27 28 DF

Mar
1 2 DF 3 4 DF
5 6 7 DF 8 9 DF 10 11 DF
12 13 14 DF 15 16 DF 17 18 DF
19 20 21 DF 22 23 DF 24 25 DF
26 27 28 DF 29 30 DF 31

Apr
1 DF
2 3 RB 4 5 DF 6 DF 7 8
9 10 RB 11 12 13 DF 14 15 DF
16 17 RB 18 19 DF 20 DF 21 22
23 24 RB 25 26 DF 27 28 29
30

May
1 RB 2 3 DF 4 DF 5 6
7 8 RB 9 10 DF 11 DF 12 13 DF
14 15 RB 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 DF 23 24 DF 25 26 27 DF
28 29 DF 30 DF 31

Jun
1 2 3 DF
4 5 RP 6 7 DF 8 9 10 DF
11 12 RP 13 14 DF 15 16 17 DF
18 19 EM 20 21 DF 22 23 24 DF
25 26 DF 27 28 RB 29 30

Jul      Su                  M                 Tu                 W                Th                   F                  Sa
1 DF
2 3 RB 4 5 6 DF 7 8
9 10 RB 11 12 DF 13 14 15 EM
16 17 RB 18 19 RB 20 21 22 DF
23 24 RP 25 26 DF 27 28 29 RB
30 31 RB

Aug
1 2 RP 3 4 DF 5
6 7 RP 8 9 10 RB 11 DF 12
13 14 RP 15 16 17 DF 18 19 RP
20 21 RB 22 23 RP 24 25 26 RP
27 28 RP 29 30 RP 31

Sep
1 2 RP
3 4 RP 5 6 RP 7 8 9
10 11 RB 12 13 RB 14 15 RP 16
17 18 RB 19 20 FM 21 22 23 RP
24 25 26 RP 27 28 29 30 RP

Oct
1 2 RB 3 4 RB 5 6 7 RB
8 9 10 RP 11 12 RP 13 14
15 16 RB 17 18 RB 19 20 21 RP
22 23 RP 24 25 RP 26 27 28 RP
29 30 RP 31

Nov
1 RB 2 3 4 RP
5 6 7 RB 8 RP 9 10 11 RP
12 13 RB 14 15 RP 16 17 18 DF
19 20 DF 21 22 RP 23 24 25 RB
26 27 28 RB 29 30

Dec
1 2
3 4 RP 5 6 DF 7 8 9 RB
10 11 RP 12 13 14 DF 15 16 RP
17 18 RP 19 20 RB 21 22 23 DF
24 25 26 27 RB 28 29 DF 30
31

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