Monday, May 23, 2022

 

Obscurity of the Day: The Secret Heart

 


You've gotta give the Chicago Tribune points for thinking outside the box in the early 1970s. They finally dropped some of their old deadwood (I'm looking at you, Smitty, Smilin' Jack and Little Joe) and tried out new features that were definitely new and different (Friday Foster and Ambler immediately pop to mind). 

Another original strip was The Secret Heart, which aimed to bring romance comics to the newspaper. Y'know, I've been trying to think of an earlier example of  romance comics in newspapers and I can't come up with anything. Sure, you've got the old magazine cover series of the 20s and 30s, but those were playing for laughs, and then you've got the panels by Nell Brinkley and her followers, but those really don't attempt to tell ongoing soap opera-style romance stories. Do we count strips like The Girls in Apartment 3-G and On Stage as romance comics? Or Brenda Starr, or Mary Worth? Seems like those strips aim a little wide of the mark -- they are soap operas, granted, but it seems like they want to take in more ground than just romance.

Questions which I guess are pretty academic since The Secret Heart crashed and burned quickly, leaving hardly a trace behind. But 50 internet points to the first commenter who names a 'serious' romance comic strip that resembled this one in the 1980s! (no I don't mean Bears in Love). 

Anyway, I'm wandering. The Secret Heart, which also went by the name of My Story* and Story-A-Week** for awhile, offered exactly that -- a romance story that was told in the period of one week -- six dailies leading up to a Sunday in which the gal would get the guy, or the guy would get the gal, or heartbreak when neither happened. The final panel of the Sunday would introduce the next story, starting next Monday. 

The feature looked like a (better than average) romance comic book. The art was provided by "Jorge Franch", apparently a nome de plume of Jordi Franch Cubells. This Spanish artist is said to have gotten the job on the strip through his friend and mentor Jorge Longaron, who was providing the art on Friday Foster for the Chicago Tribune-New York News Syndicate. 

The stories were provided by veteran comic strip scripter Jim Lawrence, and they're problematic. In an apparent bid to be hard-hitting and relevant Lawrence sometimes tells tales involving sexual assault,  workplace harrassment and other gritty stuff, subjects that may belong on the front page but maybe not in a romance comic presumably meant to appeal to teenage girls.

The strip debuted on June 18 1973***, but good luck finding papers that ran the strip -- they are exceedingly scarce. Neither the Tribune or New York News felt it was worthy of in-house support, so that wasn't a good precedent. And since the strip required client papers to run both the daily and Sunday, that was a tough sell -- even if features editors really like the strip it can be tough to make room in both the Sunday and daily for a new feature.

The Secret Heart made it only a little more than three months before the syndicate threw in the towel. The feature ended on September 30 1973.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* Oddly, this title was used on the half-page original art of the Sundays --- but I've never seen a printed example of the Sunday that ran as anything other than a third page. And on the third-page version, the in-strip title was "The Secret Heart".

** This title was used by the Detroit Free Press -- see sample above.

*** Start and end dates from Detroit Free Press.

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Comments:
I seem to remember a Barbara Cartland ( prolific English Romance writer) strip with art by Gray Morrow in the 80's which ran in some New Zealand women's magazines in the 80's.Didn't read it but did notice the nice art by Morrow. I'm not sure if that ran in the United States though
 
"Barbara Cartland's Romances" ran from 1980 through 1983 here in the US, syndicated by United Feature Syndicate. If memory serves, it was also written by Jim Lawrence.

As to another "romance" strip, I'd venture that Stan Drake's "The Heart of Juliet Jones" comes closest to the mark. I've read the CCP (and some other) reprints, and most story arcs either focused on or involved Eve or Julie romantically linked to some guy who ultimately proves unworthy or married or too focused on his career.

You can make an argument that Li'l Abner was a romance strip. How else to explain its focus on the Abner and Daisy Mae romance for nearly its entire run, even after she finally caught and married the big lug. Some of their most touching romantic moments occurred after they were married.

Many other strips featured romantic elements. Tarzan had Jane, Flash had Dale, Popeye had Olive, Dick Tracy had Tess Trueheart, Skeezix had Nina, and even Prince Valiant had Aleta.


 
Then there was "Torchy in Heartbeats" by Jackie Ormes [1950-1954], about a young African-American woman's search for Mr. Right.
 
Yup, BC's Romances was the strip I had in mind. Probably ought to do a post on that one of these days. And Doug, great catch there, Torchy definitely qualifies, though the subject matter did stray a bit in later years.

--Allan
 
The San Antonio Light also ran the complete run like The Detroit Free Press (1/3 Sundays). The paper drop Friday Foster to run The Secret Heart.
 
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Sunday, May 22, 2022

 

Wish You Were Here, from Rose O'Neill

 

Here's another Rose O'Neill Kewpie card, issued in the 1920s by the Gibson Art Company of Cincinnati.

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Saturday, May 21, 2022

 

Herriman Saturday: April 4 1910

 

April 4 1910 -- Johnson is so often persecuted by the police that the idea he will be in jail sometime between now and the Fight of the Century is a bet that would not get you long odds. Herriman today suggests that such a visit would be good for his training regime.

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Friday, May 20, 2022

 

Ink-Slinger Profiles by Alex Jay: Raymond A. Freil




Raymond “Dick” Freil was born on June 25, 1893 in Yonkers, New York, according to his World War I draft card which had his middle name as McShea (his mother’s maiden name). However, in earlier census records, his middle initial was R. When Freil passed away his middle initial was A. 


The 1900 U.S. Federal Census said Freil was the oldest of four children born to Richard, a barber, and Mary. His father was born in Pennsylvania and mother in New Jersey. The family lived in Yonkers, New York at 32 Madison Avenue. 


According to the 1905 New York state census, the family of seven resided at 325 Walnut Street in Yonkers. Freil’s father was an insurance agent. 


In the 1910 census, the Freil family had grown to nine members. They remained in Yonkers at a new address, 34 Victor Street. 


The Herald Statesman (Yonkers, New York), May 24, 1939, said Freil attended School Twelve, St. Joseph’s School and Yonkers High School and trained at the Art Student’s League in New York City. He “entered the newspaper cartooning field at an early age and when seventeen was doing a cartoon a week for the old New York Telegram. He was associated with Bert Green in the creation of Green's famous ‘Letters of an Interior Decorator.’” In 1916 Freil produced the newspaper panel feature Days You’ll Never Forget, which was distributed by an unknown syndicate.


 




The 1911 Yonkers city directory listed Freil as an artist at 34 Victor Street. He was an artist at 177 Elm Street in 1913 through 1916 directories. In 1917 Friel’s Yonkers residence was 11 Terrace Place. 


The New York, New York Marriage License Index, at Ancestry.com, said Freil and Ruth R. Walker obtained a Manhattan license on December 8, 1916.


Freil signed his World War I draft card on June 5, 1917. Freil, his wife and child lived at 12 Terrace Place in Yonkers. He was employed at the Cameragraph Film Co., 144 West 44th Street, in Manhattan. His description was slender build, medium height, with black hair and hazel eyes. 


In 1918 the Yonkers directory listed Freil at 402 East 242nd Street which was in the Bronx. Freil may have been involved with an animation studio. Raoul Barré formed his animation studio in the Bronx. With Thomas Bowers, they founded the Barré-Bowers Studio which produced the Mutt and Jeff animated cartoons in 1916. Under duress, Barré quit in 1918. Freil was under contract to the Bud Fisher Films Corporation, beginning April 1, 1919, to continue work on the series. Freil’s contract was transferred to the Jefferson Film Corporation.


The 1920 census said Freil, his wife and son were Bronx residents at 2565 Grand Concourse. Freil was an animation cartoonist. Who’s Who in Animated Cartoons (2006) said the Mutt and Jeff series, in 1921, continued with the Jefferson Film Corporation. 


The February 12, 1921 issues of Motion Picture News and Moving Picture World said Freil was joining the scenario staff of Coast Studio. 


The Story of British Animation (2021) said “... It was with the arrival in 1924 of another American animator, Dick Friel [sic], that the British industry switched to the ‘Bray-Hurd process’ that was used into the 1910s ...” The Herald-Statesman said Freil animated cartoons for United Artists in England. 


Freil was not found in the 1925 New York state census. He was listed as a writer in the 1927 Yonkers directory at 43 Ravine Avenue. In the 1928 and 1929 directories he was a cartoonist with the Yonkers Record newspaper. 

 

Freil’s wife and son were staying with his in-laws at the same address in Yonkers. Freil’s whereabout is not known. He was listed at the same address in the 1931 Yonkers directory. 


Freil’s 1935 patent application for a “Method for Producing Animated Pictures” was granted on August 24, 1937 and published in the Official Gazette of the United States Patent Office


Some time after 1935 Freil moved West to work at the Walt Disney studio. He was mentioned in the 1991 book, Disney’s Art of Animation #1: From Mickey Mouse to Beauty and the Beast, “Another artist, Dick Friel [sic], created a beautiful water splash in forty or fifty frames instead of the usual eight.” 


Around May 1938 Freil had a heart ailment and returned to Yonkers in the summer. 


Freil passed away on May 24, 1939 in Yonkers. An obituary appeared in Motion Picture Herald, June 3, 1939. 

Raymond Freil Dies of Heart Ailment

Raymond A. Freil, cartoonist, scenario writer and former motion picture director, died May 24th in Yonkers, N. Y., of a heart ailment. He used the name Dick Freil in writing and drawing. He was 45.


Mr. Freil drew for Bud Fisher and Walt Disney in the early days of the animated cartoon. He wrote scenarios, played in Mack Sennett comedies and had directed Richard Dix and Johnny Hines in pictures. Mr. Freil also had been connected with Fox Film Company, Famous Players and Paramount.


IMDB incorrectly lists all of Raymond Freil's credits under then name Richard Friel.

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Wednesday, May 18, 2022

 

Selling It: Dick Tracy's Sweet Tooth

 

Some marketing makes you scratch your head and wonder just what the heck they were thinking. Now this ad above might not reach a sublime level of irony of, say, Richard Nixon promoting tape recorders, but you really have to wonder why the brainiacs at Kraft Foods thought that it was worth paying good money to license Dick Tracy for this one-off 1959 Life magazine ad for their caramels. Okay, they wanted the motif of a Wanted poster with a Kraft caramel on it. So do that. Everyone knows what a Wanted poster (supposedly) looks like. You can get that across without lining the pockets of the Chicago Tribune-New York News Syndicate. Go to Johnstone & Cushing and tell them you need a cartoon of a police detective type, if that's so near and dear to your hearts. Sheesh.

Sorry about the crease line!

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Well that cheap Dick Tracy cartoon was right around the corner in 1961 so maybe ol' Chet was missing the cash cow of the Bonnie Braids and Sparkle Plenty dools days.
 
Hello all-
I think Mr. Cab meant "dolls", as Many years before this, dooling had been outlawed.
Even well before 1959, Tracy had been a licensing bonanza for Chi'Trib and Mr. Gould. There was another popular Dick Tracy character doll, that of B.O. Plenty. There were playtime versions of all accoutrements of law enforcement, from badges to squad cars to tommy guns, all with Tracy's imprimatur. Books,games,watches,movies, radio shows, the whole classic saturation deal. Another huge wave renewed the franchise with the TV toons, and yet another smaller one with the anticipated popularity of the 1990 feature.
That film was not a box office hit, in fact I think it It would seem that that was the last hurrah for Dick Tracy licencing. I don't think he'll be endorsing much again.
 
This feels like it was intended as one of a series, highlighting different comic strip characters. Note that Tracy is presented as a portrait on a piece of paper, and the layout could as easily serve Little Orphan Annie with slight copy tweaks ("Leapin' lizards, they're tasty!"). Maybe there are more out there, or this was a trial balloon.

I vaguely remember 1960s magazine ads for shock absorbers in the form of Dick Tracy strips. In one, Tracy and Sam blow up one truck in a convoy they suspect is full of counterfeit shock absorbers. Tracy explained (to the villainous driver who landed in a tree) that the truck was visibly carrying less weight, and was therefore carrying the lighter, inferior imitations. Even as a kid, I questioned the legality of planting dynamite under a road and waiting for a suspicious truck.

Tracy did get three serials, four B movies, a TV series, a Batman-flavored pilot, and two animated treatments (UPA's series and Filmation's "Archie's TV Funnies") before the last big-budget hurrah. His pop culture momentum is such that I'm surprised he wasn't recruited to pitch smart watches.
 
DBenson, you'll be delighted ... or horrified ... to know that I have quite a few of those Dick Tracy car part ads and will inflict them on you Strippers one of these days soon.
 
I liked the old Dick Tracy radio serial back in the late 1940's.
 
Hello again-
Did you know there was a TV series starring Ralph Byrd, the hero of the 1930's-40's serials and B pictures?
They were made in 1950-51, ending when Byrd suddenly died.If I recall, he was relaxing on his yacht at the time. Though the programmes were on film, they seem to have all been lost, though I managed to get copies of several (unconnected) episodes a few years ago. I guess that it was so early in syndication history, they were quickly forgotten, though you will notice that no new series with a new actor as Tracy appeared.
 
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Monday, May 16, 2022

 

Obscurity of the Day: Stockworth

 



When you read Dilbert have you ever wondered what the strip might be like if it was written from the perspective of the company's CEO? Well, wonder no longer, because Stockworth provided just such a strip, and did it almost a decade before Dilbert became the phenomenon of the 1990s. 

Stockworth was a strip about the CEO of a non-specific corporation, and he deals with fools, pests and irritants all the way up and down the org-chart, not to mention stockholders, journalists and customers. The strip is a little more genteel and grounded in reality than Dilbert, as befits the view from the top down instead of the bottom up. But when the strip hit its marks it was just like Dilbert -- not just funny, but very insightful about the corporate world. 

You would think that a strip about big business would be distributed through the corporate syndication channel, but Stockworth came into being as a self-syndicated strip. It was created by two business consultants, Hinda Sterling (art) and Herb L. Selesnick (writing), and was initially sold as a feature for the Boston Globe, debuting there August 2 1982. A year later the creators signed up for distribution through the New York Times Syndication Sales company, basically a black hole from whence no comic strip can ever become a success. After being distributed by that company from August 29 1983* to October 13 1984** with little to show for it, Sterling and Selesnick returned to the realm of self-syndication. They stuck with the do-it-yourself route for at least another year and a half until March 18 1986** before throwing in the towel, or at least losing the last paper I can find running it. 

The strip was collected in book form three years later, as Stockworth: An American CEO, once again self-published. If you have an interest in business humor from the perspective of the head honcho, I highly recommend it.


* Source: Boston Globe

** Source: Belleville News-Democrat

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Any resemblance to Daddy Warbucks strictly intentional!
 
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Sunday, May 15, 2022

 

Wish You Were Here, from John Stanley

 


John Stanley barely qualifies for appearing here on Stripper's Guide, but he sneaks in by having ghosted the Little Lulu newspaper comic strip for awhile in 1969. This card is not signed, but I can't imagine anyone but John Stanley having drawn a face like that. 

This card was issued by Colourpicture of Boston Massachusetts as part of their Plastichrome line; this card is coded as P6515. The card is undated and unused, but I'm guessing 1950s or 60s?

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Saturday, May 14, 2022

 

Herriman Saturday: April 3 1910

 

April 3 1910 -- Such is the public's insatiable interest in the upcoming Fight of the Century that Herriman posits a man letting his house burn down in order to goggle at Jeffries eating a meal.

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Friday, May 13, 2022

 

Obscurity of the Day: Look Out for the Jinx

 

Hal Coffman put most of his efforts at Hearst into producing editorial cartoons for the Arthur Brisbane editorials, but he was also sometimes tapped early on to contribute a strip here and there. 

In the case of Look Out for the Jinx, though, it appears not to have run in the Hearst flagship papers, and so was not caught by my Hearst indexers who worked off of the New York American and Journal. For some reason I can only find this strip running in the Washington Evening Star, not part of the Hearst chain, where it appeared sporadically from June to September 1911. It was definitely syndicated by Hearst, though, as a few examples show a copyright to National News Association, one of the many Hearst sub-companies. 

The strip is good fun. A little imp called The Jinx is the personification of trouble, and he causes, or at least appears as an eyewitness, to all sorts of bad outcomes. The only problem with the strip is that it is basically a rehash of Jonah, A Whale for Trouble, which Frank King penned a year before for the Chicago Tribune.

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In the same vein as "Joys And Glooms."
 
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Wednesday, May 11, 2022

 

Obscurity of the Day: Gloria

 








It's quite ironic that the Associated Press decided to get into the comic strip syndicate game. They put together a fine roster of features but then were too embarrassed to admit that their serious news agency was now in the business of distributing lighthearted fun, so they practically made the whole division a corporate secret.  

Julian Ollendorff's Gloria was on the original roster of features when the syndicate debuted on March 17 1930. Ollendorff's fast-paced, bubbly tale of a beautiful girl was the newspaper page equivalent of the popular movies of the day. Lots of snarky, sophisticated dialogue, jet-setting locales, attractive high society people -- it was just what the doctor ordered for a country learning what it means to be in a Great Depression. 

Unfortunately, Ollendorff's Gloria was not to last very long. The strip ended after a one-year contract on March 16 1931; evidently either the syndicate was unhappy with it or Ollendorff was ready for greener pastures. The syndicate replaced it with Oh Diana* by Don Flowers, another pretty girl strip with a similar but softer tone. Flowers produced a very fine strip, but  I have to give Gloria the nod for having a little more chutzpah to it.

 

* Originally titled Diana Dane when it debuted.

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Monday, May 09, 2022

 

Toppers: Buzzy

 

Buzzy was the topper to Ferd Johnson's Texas Slim, a strip that I think basically existed as a reward to Ferd for his service assisting on Moon Mullins. I am not a fan of  Texas Slim, in which EVRBUDDY YACKS LAK DIS TIL MAH CONSARNED HAID IS PERT' NEAR SPLODIN'. It is also a strip in which fistfights and other physical humour are often supposed to function as the point, because there certainly isn't much else there to laugh at very often. 

Anyhow, if Texas Slim doesn't rate a place in my own personal hall of fame, the topper Buzzy is just so utterly lackluster that I can't even manage to form an opinion. It stars a rough and tumble sort of kid, and the gags are often about his interactions with his mom. In the sample above, emblematic of the series, you can see the level of sparkling wit that was generally on display. At least, thank goodness, they don't talk in the annoying patois of the main strip.

Buzzy debuted on October 10 1943* when Texas Slim was demoted from a half-pager to a third in the broadsheet format. Buzzy was also added to the tab and half-tab formats. Since very few papers took the strip outside of the Chicago Tribune family of papers, and Buzzy was usually thrown out by them, the strip can be hard to track. The latest I can find the topper running is September 6 1953**, but it could have and probably did run longer than that. Anyone know of later appearances?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* Source: Chicago Tribune

** Source: New York Daily News

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Sunday, May 08, 2022

 

Wish You Were Here, from Charles Dana Gibson

 

Here's a Gibson card issued by Henderson & Sons of England. This one is #91 from their Pictorial Comedy series. 

I confess I am not familiar with these caps as being somehow emblematic of Yankees. But I can say for sure that Googling "historical Yankee caps" will definitely not get anyone closer to answers in this regard.

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That's a Phyrgian cap, worn by Libertas, the Roman goddess of Liberty, and used as a symbol of Liberty in art (Columbia, the female personification of America, wore one). Wikipedia has an article on the cap.

I'm guessing that it's a reference to the Suffragettes.
 
I think this actually an early version of a Smurfette.
 
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Saturday, May 07, 2022

 

Herriman Saturday: April 2 1910

 

April 2 1910 -- Herriman is called upon to make almost daily strips about the upcoming Fight of the Century. Naturally (I suppose) this devolves mostly into jibes against Johnson, in the spirit of giving mostly white newspaper readers what they want. 

This strip, in which Johnson sets out to outdo Jeffries on various counts, includes a doubled speeding ticket in the final panel. There is a story often told of the champ that he was once pulled over for speeding and that the fine, to be paid directly to the officer, was $50. The champ supposedly hands him a $100 bill, and the cop says he can't make change for the big bill. Johnson tells him not to worry, keep the extra $50 as he has every intention of driving just as fast on his return trip later. 

I don't know if this story was already in circulation by April 1910, but I have to guess it was; otherwise Herriman is exhibiting quite an amazing ability to foretell the future.

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Friday, May 06, 2022

 

Obscurity of the Day: The Quality Kid

 


 



 

John R. Bray is remembered today as a pioneer in the field of animation, but he also had an earlier career in newspaper comics. Most of his work was for the McClure Syndicate, but he was not so greatly in demand that he wouldn't jump on other offers of work. 

That would be the case with The Quality Kid, a feature he created for the short-lived Publishers Press Syndicate. We've discussed that syndicate before in connection with Harrison Cady's Jolly Jumpers. Bray came late to the party, when Publishers Press was close to gasping its last. The Quality Kid debuted on June 1 1913, and it went down the tubes with the comics section itself on September 7 1913*. 

The Quality Kid concerns itself with a rich kid and two ragamuffin street urchins. Most comics that put together rich and poor kids have the poor ones outsmarting or just plain bullying the 'quality' kid, but in Bray's strip the kids are partners-in-crime, with all the kids out to pull pranks, sometimes on others, sometimes on each other. A running gag is that the butler, James, is not the intended butt of these goings-on, but often gets caught up in the tide much to his detriment.

The series was attractive but quite repetitive, but it probably mattered very little to Bray. He was busy forming his new animation studio at essentially the same time as The Quality Kid was hitting the few remaining client papers of Publishers Press. Bray's first cartoon short, The Artist's Dream, was released in July 1913. 

~~~~~~~~~

* Sources: Running dates from Atlanta Constitution and St. Paul Pioneer Press.


Comments:
Pleasant to look at but Bray certainly had problems with balloon order. I'm surprised his cartoons didn't run back to front.
 
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Wednesday, May 04, 2022

 

E&P Mystery Strips: Letter 'S'

 I stalled out on this series with letter 'R' in 2013, but here are the 'S'es and all it took was slightly less than a decade! 

Okay, here's how this works, for those who haven't been keeping up with the whirlwind pace. The Editor & Publisher Syndicate Yearbooks, published from 1924 until 2010, listed theoretically all the available syndicated features, including comic strips and panels. Those listings often included features that I've never been able to locate. Some of them, no doubt, never appeared anywhere and were just wishful thinking. But if you look at previous letters, and the later exclamations of discovery from myself and others, some of these features can and do let themselves be found by the most intrepid researchers.

Therefore your task, if you wish to accept it, is to go forth on a hard target search of every research library, online digital newspaper archive and the material in your own collection, and report back to Stripper's Guide Central with your discoveries. 


Title

Creator(s)

Syndicate

Advertised Format/Frequency

Years Advertised

Notes/Status (blank means still a mystery)

Saddle Sore

Frank Barnett

American International

Daily panel

1989-91

 

Saddle Sores

George Alblitz

Trans World News

Daily strip

1976-78

 

Saint Paul & Duncan

David Watkins, Wayne Dunifon

Suzerain

Daily panel

1992-95

 

Saltwood

D. Leahy, Piper

Columbia Features

Daily

1988-89

 

Sam & Max, Freelance Police

Steve Purcell

At Large Features

Weekly strip

2001-02

No mention of a newspaper series on the charcaters’ Wikipedia page.

Sam Mantics

Carey Orr Cook

Sam Mantics Enterprises

Twice weekly strip

1990-93

 

Sam Scout

W.Clay, Len Glasgow, Lane, Mead, Warkentin

World News Syndicate

Daily/Sunday strip

1972-77

 

Sampson

Ken and Lorretta Bank

Dickson-Bennett

Daily panel

1984

 

San Victorino

Gamez

Colombian Comics

Daily/Sunday strip

1990-96

 

Sandcastles

Greg Curfman

Sandcastles Syndicate

Weekly strip

1976

 

Sandlot Sammy

Harry E. Godwin

Quaker Features

Daily strip

1925

 

Sandy’s World

Roy Doty

Paradigm-TSA

Daily/Sunday strip

1999

 

Santigwar

R. Lee

American International

Daily strip

1987-89

 

Sargent MacDoogle

Rick Wilson

Wilson Syndicate

Daily panel

1975-76

 

Sassafrass Tea

Bob Howard

Bob Howard Enterprises

Weekly panel

1973

 

Sassy Makes Three

Arlene Rowles, Ann Mace

Cascade Features

Weekly

1990

 

Saturn Against The Earth

Uncredited

Press Alliance

Weekly strip

1940

 

School Daze

John Owens

American International

Daily panel

1993-94

 

Scientific Sam

Maurice Beam

Universal Press

Daily strip

1935

 

Scoop Roundtree

Nathan Diggs, J. Anderson

Amadou Features

Weekly strip

1973

 

Scorer

John Gillatt, Barrie Tomlinson

North America Syndicate

Daily strip

1992-98

Well-known British strip, but did it appear in US newspapers?

Scotty the Wonder Dog

E.I. Reed

Miller Features

Daily strip

1939-40

 

Scrappy

Charles Mintz

Eisner-Iger Associates

Daily/weekly strip

1937

Is this the same as the known “Scrappy Sayings” panels?

Scraps

Michael Wakinyan

United Cartoonist Syndicate

Daily

1987-88

 

Screams

Guy Gilchrist, Ralph Hagen

DBR Media

Weekly panel

2002-2000s

 

Scroll of Fame

A.S. Curtis

Self-syndicated

Sunday strip

1951-61

 

Scruffles

Uncredited

TV Compulog

Weekly strip

1976

 

The Sea Hawk

Uncredited

Eric Jon Inc.

Weekly strip

1955-61

 

Sea Rations

James Estes

Star-Telegram Syndicate

Daily strip

1974

 

Seaweed

Johnny Sajem

Trans World News/Allied Press

Daily strip

1977-81

 

Sebastian

Alex Stefanson

Dickson-Bennett/Weekly Features

Daily panel

1984-85

 

See For Yourself

Uncredited

Associated Press

Weekly

1946

 

Seems Funny But It’s True

Ralph S. Matz

Matz Features/Unique Features

Daily strip

1936-39

 

Seven Errors

F. Hays

BP Singer

Weekly

1976-78

 

Shakespeare Plays

Luzny

Canada Wide Features

Daily strip

1947-48

Any distribution in US?

Shamrocks

Kessler, McCarty

Kay Features

Daily panel

1932-33

 

Shanghai Lil

Sarge O’Neill

Southern Cartoon Syndicate

Daily panel

1970-78

 

Sheena, Queen of the Jungle

W. Morgan Thomas

Eisner-Iger Associates

Weekly strip

1938-39

 

Sheriff of Pina Coda

Mike Moen

Suzerain

Daily strip

1986

 

Sherlock Home

Bob Goodbread

Dickson-Bennett

Daily panel

1984

 

Sheroderfield

Jeff Koterba

Dickson-Bennett

Weekly strip

1980-81

 

Sherwood

Robert Nunn

Weekly Features/American Way Features

Daily strip

1986-88

 

Sherwood Forest

Mike Bannon, Dave Gregory

Dickson-Bennett

Daily/weekly strip

1981-84

 

Short Cake

Pedro Moreno

United Cartoonist Syndicate

Daily panel

1982

 

Short Stuff

Jack Flynn

Trans World/Dickson-Bennett

Daily strip

1978-84

 

Short Short Stories

Charles Hendrick Jr.

Continental Features

Weekly panel

1998-2000s

 

Showcase for New Cartoonists

John Shepherd

Self-syndicated

Weekly strip

1993

 

Side Laughs

William Ferguson

NEA

Weekly strip

1937

 

Side Show

Oz Black, E.H. Peterson

Inter-American Newspaper/Thompson Service

Daily panel

1934-36

 

Sideline

Rick Goldsberry

American International

Daily panel

1990-91

 

Sign-o-Rama

M.W. Martin

Self-syndicated

Daily panel

1970-79

 

Silent Sam

Kern Pederson

American International

Daily strip

1988-98

 

Silky ‘n Vixen

Russ De Marks

Russell Enterprises

Daily strip

1969-71

 

Silly Dillies

Bob Lagers

Ledger Syndicate

Daily panel

1967-70

 

Simon Cool

Jerry Breen

Allied Press

Daily strip

1980

 

Simple Interest

Anthony Schultz

J Features

Weekly panel

1998-2000s

 

Simpleman

Wim Van Wieringen

Douglas Whiting Limited

Unstated

1959

Dutch – appeared in US?

Single Again

Michael Byrne

Allied Press

Daily strip

1980-81

 

Single Again

Evan Diamond

Miller Features

Daily strip

2000

 

Sister Anne

Peter John Fugere

Trans World

Daily/weekly panel

1976-78

 

Six-Gun Days

Reg Manning

McClure

Daily/weekly

1931

 

Sketch Book

Gaylord,Zibellie

United Feature

Daily panel

1946

 

Sketches

Lambert Guenther

T-Bean Syndicate

?

1926

 

Sketches

George Spohn

Matz Features

Daily strip

1934

 

Sketches From Life

Joseph Buresch

Unique Features

Weekly strip

1938

 

Sketches From The War Front/Sketches From Life

Ralph Matz

Matz Features

Weekly strip

1939,1941

 

Skip Logan

Al Fagaly

Thompson Service

Daily strip

1937-41

 

Skipper Windward

P.J. Kuhn

Douglas Whiting Ltd

Daily strip

1961-64

 

The Skipper

Ron W. Stanfield

Trans World

Daily panel

1977-79

 

Skippy

Percy Crosby

Winford Co.

Daily/Sunday strip

1971-72

Re-run syndication.

Sky Capers

Joel Shalit

Dickson-Bennett

Weekly panel

1980-81

 

Sky Pirates

Uncredited

Allied Press

Weekly strip

1940

 

Skyrocket Steele

William Everett

Watkins Syndicate

Weekly strip

1939

 

Slangy Seth

Maurice Beam

Universal Press

Daily/weekly panel

1935

 

Slapsic

Tom Hickey

McNaught

Daily panel

1958

 

Slewfoot

Nellis Johnson

Dickson-Bennett

Daily/weekly strip

1981-82

 

Small Potatoes

John Barclay

American International

Daily strip

1989

 

Small Shots

Bill Johnson

Richmond Syndicate

Daily/Sunday panel

1979

 

Small Talk

Allan H. Kelly Jr.

Self-syndicated

Daily panel

1983-2000s

The copyrighted logo was dregistered as abandoned as of 1985.

Small World

Don Roberts

United Press International

Daily strip

1984

 

Smile Awhile

Dave Allen

Worldwide Media

Weekly panel

2000-03

 

Smile A While

Joe Buresch

Newspaper Art Features

Daily panel/Sunday strip

1939

 

Smiles

Frank Chapman

International Syndicate

Daily panel

1924-39

 

Smiling Out Loud

Sarge O’Neill

Southern Cartoon Syndicate

Daily panel

1970-76

 

Smitty

Don Gibbons

Weekly Features

Daily strip

1986-87

 

Snapper Smith

Uncredited

Beacon Newspaper Svc

Daily strip

1940

 

Snappy Grampy

Lyle Sterrett

Trans World

Daily panel

1976-78

 

Snojoe

George Donison

Canada Wide Features

Daily strip

1970-71

Appeared in US?

Snubby

Reg Manning

Bell Syndicate

Daily strip

1946

 

The Soaps

Joan Altabe

Dickson Features

Weekly strip

1980

 

Socko the Sea Dog

“Teddy” (Jack Kirby)

Keystone Press/Lincoln Features

Daily strip

1938-40

 

The Solar Legion

Uncredited

Beacon Newspaper Svs

Daily/Sunday strip

1940

 

Soldier Comic

Max Milians

Minority Features

Weekly strip

1942

 

Solve This Crime

Philip Nowlan

National Newspaper Svc

Daily panel

1931

 

Some Things Never Change

Stephen Templeton

American International

Sunday panel

1995

 

Something New For Tots To Do

Frank Hopkins

Audio Service

Daily panel

1926

 

Son & Co.

John Roman

King Features

Daily/Sunday strip

2000

 Found by Henkster in Detroit Free Press on a trial basis on a few dates; Salt Lake Tribune ran it for a few months

Sophisticated Lady

Dorothy Mylria

National Newspaper Svc

Daily panel

1957-59

 

Sorry About That

Joe Capelini

Community Features

Daily/weekly panel

1981

 

Sourdough

Robert Tremblay

United Cartoonist Syndicate

Daily

1986-88

 

South Sea Girl

Thorne Stevenson (and John Forte)

Phoenix Features

Daily strip

1974

Have seem much original art from the early 50s but never anything in newspapers.

Space Case

Hoey Morris

Callie-Pearl International

Daily strip

1983-84

 

The Space Frontier

James V. Johnson

Sun News Features

Daily strip

1960-63

 

Space Shots

Emil V. Abrahamian

Trans World

Daily panel

1978

 

Space-Nuts

Pedro Moreno

United Cartoonist Syndicate

Daly strip

1982-84

 

Spaced Out

Keith M. Manzella

Newspaper Features

Daily strip

1988-94

 

The Spacers

Emil V. Abrahamian

Trans World

Daily/weekly strip

1978-98

 

The Spacians

Larz Borne

Ledger Syndicate

Daily strip

1965

 

Sparky

Bob Larsen

Dickson-Bennett

Daily strip

1984-85

 

Special Ed

Pedro Moreno

Comic Art Therapy

Daily

1993-94

 

The Specialists

Bill Barry

Adventure Features

Daily/Sunday strip

1994-95

 

Speed Centaur

Malcolm Kildale

Watkins Syndicate

Weekly strip

1939

 

Spencer Steel

Dennis Colebrook

Eisner-Iger Associates

Weekly strip

1937-39

 

Sport Day

Bill Morgan

Columbia Features

Daily panel

1981-84

 

Sport Snickers

Lenny Hollreiser

Hayden-Kennedy Syndicate

Daily strip

1950

 

Sport-Spots

Brook Slover

R-GAB Features

Daily/weekly panel

1980

 

The Sporting Thing

 

Joe E. Buresch

Self-syndicated

Weekly panel

1959

 

Sportoons

Cliff Johnson, Bill Mittlebeeler, Jim Richardson

Dickson-Bennett

Daily/weekly panel

1980-84

 

Sports Cars Speed

Judd Burrow

B&B

Weekly panel

1960-63

 

Sports Chuckles

Al Leiderman

American International

Daily panel

1992

 

The Sports File

Emil V. Abrahamian

Trans World

Daily panel

1978-97

 

Sports Woman

Sandy Dean

Dickson-Bennett

Daily/weekly panel

1984-85

 

Sportsfun

Merve Magus

Dickson-Bennett

Daily/weekly strip

1982-84

 

Sportsville

Thomas E. Moran

Trans World

Daily/weekly panel

1976-78

 

Spot

Donald Vanozzi, Joe Zeis

Sparks Syndicate

Weekly

1991

 

Spy Hunters

Lochlan Field

Watkins Syndicate

Weekly strip

1939

 

Squeegee

Ken Muse

Community Features/Dickson-Bennett

Daily/weekly panel

1980-95

 

Squeeky Break

Ray Rubbin

Dickson-Bennett

Daily panel

1983-84

 

Squiggles

Grace Lee Richardson

Dickson-Bennett

Daily strip

1980-81

 

St. Peter’s Gate

Pedro Moreno

United Cartoonist Syndicate

Daily panel

1980-84

 

Stacy

Randy Bisson

Dickson-Bennett

Daily/weekly strip

1981-98

 

Stained Glass

Jonny Hawkins

Davy Associates

Weekly panel

1998-2000s

 

Standouts

Mal Eno

Atlas Features

Weekly panel

1949-50

 

Stanislaus

Dan Nevins

Chicago Tribune-NY News

Weekly strip

1980

 

Stanley & Decker

Roger Kliesh

Wade’s Cartoon Svc

Weekly strip

1991

 

Star Points

Carl Kuhn

Thompson Service

Daily/weekly panel

1935

 

Star Warriors

F. Treadgold

BP Singer Features

Weekly strip

1978

 

Star Weevils

J. Michael Leonard

Rip-Off Press

Weekly strip

1978

 

Startling Facts

Ferd Himme

Lowery Cartoons

Weekly panel

1932

 

The State of Georgia

R. David Boyd

Mark Morgan Inc

Weekly

1993-2000s

 

Static

B.W. Depew

Register & Tribune Syndicate

Daily panel

1928

 

Station I-M-D-Z

Jack Jay

Paramount Syndicate

Daily strip

1937

 

Status Quo

Charlie Wible

Richard Lynn Enterprises

Daily panel

1978-79

 

Stella Starlet

Martin, Stone

Dickson-Bennett

Daily panel

1984

 

Still Waiting

Bryan Ubaghs

At Large Features

Daily strip

2001-02

 

Stitch In Time

James Janeway

American International

Daily strip

1992

 

Stories of Real People

Vernon Rieck

Velerie Productions

?

1961

 

Stories of the Opera

Bernard Baily

Bell Syndicate

Daily

1949

 

Strange Accidents

Bunny Hogarth

Leeds Features

Daily panel

1933

 

Strange Encounters of the Unexplained and Bizarre

Fred Hull, Bill Barry

Adventure Features

Daily/Sunday strip

1981-83

 

Strangely Enough

John Duncan

JAD’s Service

Weekly panel

1938

 

Stranger Than Fiction

Ralph Matz

Matz Features

Daily strip

1939

 

The Strangest Thing

Everett Erwin

Western Newspaper Union

Weekly panel

1946

 

Strike Out

Martin Grodt

Editors Syndicate

Daily panel

1949-50

 

Stromboli

Mario Risso

Trans World

Daily/weekly panel

1976

 

Strongman

Uncredited

Beacon Newspaper Syndicate

Daily/Sunday strip

1940

 

Stump The Ump

Dywelska, Kent

Liberty Features

Weekly strip

1991-94

 

Stumpy Stumbler

Emil V. Abrahamian

Self-syndicated

Daily/weekly strip

1983-2002

 

Sub Rosa

Mimi

Bell Syndicate

Daily strip

1925

 

Subito

Bozz

Press Alliance

Daily/Occasional (!)

1950-52

 

Suburbia

Don Raden

Suburban Features

Weekly panel

1976-85

 

Sugar

Jack Fitch

A.S. Curtis Features

Daily strip

1949-61

 

Suggestion Box

Steve Moore

Star Group

Weekly

1984-85

 

Sunday Laughs/Sunday Laugh Male Cartoons

Paul Swede

BP Singer

Weekly strip

1973-93

 

Sunday at the Movies with Louie Loophole

Joe Gurrera

Comic Art Therapy

Sunday

1994-95

 

Sunny Side Up

Frank Drake

United Cartoonist Syndicate

Daily

1985

 

Sunny Sue

Jack Fitch, Edna Markham

A.S. Curtis

Daily strip

1950-61

 

Sunset Park

Ralph Aspinwall

Dickson-Bennett

Daily/weekly strip

1981-82

 

Super Kat

William L. Harper

Palestine Herald Press

Daily/weekly strip

1975-78

 

Super Shrink

Edward Stark

Trans World

Daily panel

1977-79

 

Super And Pals

Blackburn, Thomas

Trans World

Daily panel

1977-78

 

Suzerain’s Wildlife

Joe Fahey

Suzerain

Daily

1986

 

The Swingers

Barbara Jones

Allied Feature

Daily panel

1969

 

Swoosh Morgan

Rolland Lynch

N.E.W.S.

Daily/Sunday strip

1949

 

Sycamore Center

Graham Hunter

Oklahoman & Times

Weekly strip

1965-66

 

 

Labels:


Comments:
Saturno contro la Terra, Italian comic.
 
As "Anonymous" pointed out, "Saturn Against the Earth" is a translation of a strip which appeared in an Italian weekly comics magazine. So is "Sky Pirates" ("Il Pirata del Cielo"). Both features found a home in short-lived American comic books: "Saturn" in McKay's "Future Comics" and "Pirates" in Hawley's "Sky Blazers" (both 1940). The E&P listing may have been a trial balloon to judge syndicate interest in the features. Maybe the owners didn't get the desired result and decided to go with comic books instead.

I've seen (but unfortunately don't have) a trade display ad urging editors to buy these two titles as well as a third, "Zorro of the Metropolis." "Zorro" doesn't seem to have appeared anywhere. The McKay and Hawley books only lasted a couple of issues each, taking the Italian strips down with them. I speculate that the buildup to World War II put an end to this international venture.
 
Since posting above I ran across an Italian essay shedding a bit more light on the issue. According to the article, the success of "Saturno Contro la Terra" (1936-1938) in Italy inspired its publisher, Mondadori, to try selling Mondadori strips to English language markets. "Through La Helicon Italiana, an organization created in the 1930s to promote national comics abroad" they pitched Mondadori product in England and the United States as well as in Europe and Latin America. The project was blocked by "Italian foreign policy" in regards to the War. Little information about Helicon Italiana exists because their headquarters were bombed out in 1944.

It's interesting that "Saturn" and other Mondadori comic projects were conceived and plotted by Cesare Zavattini, who after the war found fame as a screenwriter of neorealist classics such as "Bicycle Thieves" and "Umberto D."
 
"The Strangest Thing" by Everett Erwin appeared in "The Virden (Ills.) Recorder" from 18 July 1946 to 18 September 1947.
"The Spacians" by animation great Larz Bourne would've been interesting, but I was told by people involved in the project that though the "ledger Syndicate" (or, "The NEW Ledger Syndicate" announced several titles, including a revival of the original Ledger's star feature, Hairbreadth Harry, they only managed to get one strip launched, "Batman". This was in 1966, where you'd think the hottest property on TV would be a smash, but the new Ledger was even worse run than it's inspiration, and flopped.
"Scorer" was handled by us at KFS/NAS for several years, along with the London Mirror's other offerings like "The Perishers" and "Millie", but we really couldn't get US papers to touch anything but Andy Capp. So As far as I know, no US Scorer sales.
 
The feature listed as "Slapsic" is "Slapsie," based on boxer and character actor Slapsie Maxie Rosenbloom. It's mentioned in many online bios of the artist, Tom Hickey...though, in Internet fashion, they may all be quoting a single source. I've never seen an example. I have posted a request on a Facebook page run by someone trying to do a Rosenbloom documentary. Maybe that will turn up something.
 
Son & Co.was in the Detroit Free Press.
 
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